Lurking within the normal Python 2.x distribution is the sqlite3 import, which is an amazingly powerful, no-server-required, mostly SQL compatible database engine that can be used in any project without restriction.

That’s the up side. The down side is, as a fairly complete database, there are many options and varied ways it can be used, and managing actual database transactions isn’t all that simple — to do it right, even a single query takes about sixteen lines of code. And yes, if you want maximum flexibility and the ability to use every feature in sqlite3, that’s how you should do it.

But. Most database operations are very straightforward. You want to issue a single command to the database, or a query. Perhaps you want to write a bunch of data and then commit it all at once so that the database doesn’t contain part of the data from a more complex transaction. You need to know if something went wrong, and if it did, what it was. Those are by far the most common use cases for me, and I suspect that’s true for others as well.

Frankly, it’s difficult enough dealing with the SQL query language itself. Why make actually using it harder than it has to be?
Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,