Some observations about the news

Bookmark and Share

I think it’s important to keep in mind that $$$-based journalism tends to have built-in mechanisms for all kinds of censorship. This is useful when considering not just what we are reading, but how and why it managed to get in front of our eyes. The following list, while not complete, serves to highlight some of the filtering going on:

  • The advertisers extend yea/nay force directly to the owner / publisher / board with $$$
  • The owner / publisher / board extends yea/nay force downwards to the editors and reporters
  • The editors extend yea/nay force downward to the reporters and the stories
  • The reporters extend yea/nay force to the choice of stories
  • The editors apply tone force to the stories
  • The reporters apply tone force to the stories
  • The reader’s reactions apply force upwards and this will slowly but strongly moderate the tone of the stories as the nature of the audience makes itself clear to the journalistic enterprise.
  • In some enterprises, the political correctness of a story will affect selection and tone
  • In other enterprises, backing agendas will affect selection and tone
  • The nature of the story – for example, “if it bleeds, it leads” can force other stories out, because drama=$$$ and there’s only X amount of time/energy to cover this or that, and advertisers primarily pay for eyes, and journalism, unfortunately, almost always devolves to a $$$-counting undertaking.

Long story short, the news that reaches us may not be the news that is most important to us, the coverage that highlights the details we should really know, or even remotely even-handed. All those pressures and factors are there almost all of the time, in almost all of the news.

On top of this, we may harbor various biases that are based on misinformation, social indoctrination (the long resistance to LGBT is one example of a source of this, as is the so-called “drug war”), and dogma from from various sources.

IMHO, much thinking is called for. My observation is that there isn’t nearly enough thinking being done by many. :/

Tags: , , , , , ,

Email This Post Email This Post

OSX Sierra crash recovery

Bookmark and Share

Well, that was unpleasant.

Without any warning, my Mac Pro began failing to redraw web pages. Presuming that Safari had become unstable, I commanded a reboot.

The reboot process got to 1/2 progress bar, then the machine shut down. Repeated several attempts, same results. Not just Safari then.

Time to recover. First I slapped a new HD in there, then used CMD-R (hold while powering up, keep holding until you get a dialog) to initiate recovery using the First Aid application from the original drive. The drive checked out okay as far as file integrity, but apparently (hopefully) the OS had developed some damaged boot settings. So. Time to recover to a new drive. I have a time machine backup on a different drive, but as it looked like the original drive was okay according to the tests the disk utility made on it, I decided to try to recover right from there. So off I went, installing OS X 10.12.6 on the new HD.

The dialog initially told me that 5 minutes were remaining. That stayed up for an hour without any visible changes in the progress bar. So I opened the log window (it’s in the Window menu of the first aid window) and saw that the progress value was at about .02%; 1% is complete (trust me, it’s not 100 as you would expect. .5% is halfway done.) It was changing, but very slowly. So I knew I had quite a wait ahead of me.

Twelve hours later, the install finally put up the OS X setup dialog. The progress bar dutifully moved from 5 minutes to 4, 3, 2, 1 and zero (Over 12 hours!?!?) as the percentage indicated in the install log window climbed towards 1%. I mean, come on. Really? I know Apple’s been lagging behind on software quality, but… really? This was over a 30 Mb DSL connection, btw. I can (maybe) understand the trickle rate of the download (Apple’s so poor they can’t afford a good connection, as all know) but the 5 minute indication… that’s just pitiful, shows a serious lack of QC.

Anyway… the recovery went well enough, if glacially, that the machine can be rebooted now, and it looks like most things are intact (not everything… recent file lists are clear, for instance) so I guess my griping can’t legitimately rise above some discontented mumbling.

It was a very unpleasant experience, though. If you have to reinstall Sierra, be aware that you can expect the dialog to bald-faced lie about the install time, and open the log from the Window menu so you can see what actual progress is being made.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Email This Post Email This Post

iToolBox
Image Editing for your DSLR and Web Images

Bookmark and Share

itb-0.36

Mac user? Looking for some free software to edit your images with? If so, I’ve cooked up an application you might very well find useful:

Introducing iToolBox in its OSX/MacOS release for OS versions 10.11 and later. iToolBox is a 64-bit application so it should be usable well into the future. iToolBox handles data with 48-bit RGB and 16 bit alpha (transparency) precision. iToolBox offers a broad, consistent feature set that is both easy to learn and easy to use.

You can check out the documentation here:

    iToolBox Documentation

And you can download the application here:

    iToolBox v1.r58 [2018-10-01]

I welcome suggestions, bug reports, etc. Here’s how to send them in.

Curious? There is a fairly extensive feature list on this page.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Email This Post Email This Post

Why I Can (Usually) Enjoy Hollywood’s Take on SF

Bookmark and Share

In my work with SF authors, and as an avid reader of SF, I run into a lot of concerns about how Hollywood “does” SF. In this post, I offer a few thoughts on that for your consideration.
Read the rest of this entry »

Email This Post Email This Post

Kenwood and Yaesu, where are you?

Bookmark and Share

ICOM’s IC-7300, r8500, IC-7610 and the currently upcoming IC-9700 are making huge impacts on AROs everywhere. This is no surprise to those of us familiar with SDR technology; older analog methods simply cannot offer the kinds of performance advantages a good SDR design can.

However, one thing these radios from ICOM have in common are some poor design choices; spectrum span choices are crippled compared to a center/demodulator tuning scheme; spectrums and waterfall displays that are insufficiently adjustable; noise blankers in the least useful portion of the signal path; insufficient “knobbiness”, so that the user interface of the radio is a great deal more clumsy than it actually needs to be.

The opportunity for Kenwood and Yaesu is clear: there’s an opening here to step in and knock ICOM off the hill they climbed up on.

Imagine a stand-alone SDR transceiver where:

  • You could conveniently place the spectrum/waterfall anywhere
  • You could adjust the amplitude/level of the waterfall and spectrum separately
  • The noise blanker reduced the noise on the display as well as in the audio
  • The display was capable of high resolution output to a monitor
  • Transmit pre-distortion provided very high quality TX
  • Important controls were given their own front panel placement
  • Full mouse/trackball integration was standard
  • Broadband IQ output was available for external use
  • Multiband EQ and compression / limiting for TX audio was provided

These are just some of the obvious places where ICOM’s radios, thus far, have fallen woefully short.

Yaesu? Kenwood? Where art thou?

Tags: , , ,

Email This Post Email This Post

Walking for your Lunch

Bookmark and Share

I spend some effort managing my weight. One of the things I do, that most people can also do, is walk. Walking can buy you a free lunch, calorie-wise. Here’s the deal…
Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , ,

Email This Post Email This Post

Magic Mouse 2 – A Terrible Design

Bookmark and Share

So, I’m an Apple user. I have issues with Apple – I imagine most users have issues with them – but I like to think they don’t often make outright stupid design errors.

But.

This time, with the Magic Mouse 2, they did. Really.
Read the rest of this entry »

Email This Post Email This Post

Something for the photo-oriented OS X user

Bookmark and Share

I have released the beta of DTank, a non-destructive image manipulation system. It’s free; if it sounds interesting, by all means check it out.

Email This Post Email This Post