Archive for category Uncategorized

aa_counter.py — pre- and post-increment and decrement in python

Screen shot 2015-05-24 at 3.36.42 PMI like Python. A lot. But it has its limits, and short of forking a new version of Python for myself, sometimes it is just best to implement some kind of work-around. In this case, for pre- and post increment and decrement operations on counters, which Python regrettably lacks.
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aa_bargraph.py — Bar graphing using text and image-free HTML

Need to graph something? Happens to me all the time. And I need some very particular functionality. But that doesn’t mean I want to code it up every time I need it, nor should you have to. Python’s import library mechanism makes “canning” nearly any functionality you can imagine easy to do, and once canned… well, you know the drill. Import libraries are wonderful.

Console (text) mode bar graph in XTerm  shell

Console (text) mode bar graph in XTerm shell

So in this case, it was bar graphs I needed. Sometimes at the console, sometimes on web pages. aa_bargraph.py puts that together and makes it usable at several different levels of sophistication, at both the console (in text mode) and within the context of an HTML web page.
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Let’s talk about on-hold music

If your company uses, or is considering using, on-hold music, please… just stop. Immediately. If for no other reason than that the digital compression now almost universally employed by the telecommunications companies dependably turns what was — or what may have been, it’s often debatable — actual music at the time when it was recorded into a phase-shifted, reduced information nightmare of excruciating abuse for the listener.

Which you are probably exacerbating by feeding into your phone system at too high a volume. But don’t reach for any knobs or sliders; you absolutely cannot fix this by changing the volume or the equalization. It is a fundamental and unavoidable problem inherent to the communications systems between your facilities and the customer.

Having on-hold music enabled makes music haters hate it more, and hate you for inflicting this horror upon them; and it makes music lovers hate you for being responsible for doing such miserable things to the music. The people who made the music are likely driven into deep depression if they happen to hear their work so abused.

To put it simply, on-hold music makes everyone hate you.

So please. Don’t enable on-hold music, or if already enabled, turn it off.

While I’m at it, try having an actual human being answer your phones. You’d be amazed what a positive first (and follow-on) impression that leaves. As opposed to:

 

Please listen carefully, as our menu options have changed.

Press one if you’d like to be driven insane by something that might have been on-hold music before it was turned into horrific, distorted mush on its way to your phone.

Press two if you’d like to listen to another menu full of options that have nothing to do with why you called.

Press three if you would like to be summarily disconnected while waiting for “the next available representative.”

Press four if you would like us to kill your cellphone battery with an indefinite hold, regularly punctuated by wholly false assurances that “we really care about you and will be with you soon.”

Press five if you’d like to be directed to our website. Please be aware that our website is only partly functional and was designed by poorly paid foreigners who have neither language skills or any understanding that websites should only take action, such as drop menus or pop up windows, when people actually click on buttons and links clearly intended to initiate such action.

Pulse seis si desea escuchar a estos menús en mal hablado español.

Press zero to hear these options again. Thank you for calling StupidCorp, and we look forward to taking your money and under-serving you in the future. Remember: StupidCorp. We were the ones that drove you to regular doses of Bupropion. Now you can up your dose!

…All with underlying noise that makes (what used to be) music seem as if it had been pushed through an outhouse. From deep below. Backwards.

Amazon Echo really, really needs this feature

What if it was easy to make Amazon’s Echo do anything your computer knows about, or you can make it know about? That’s what I’m going to talk about here.

It’ll be worth your time, I promise.

The Echo is a nice device to have around the house; you can ask it some things that Amazon has set up, you can even launch a few (very few) things via the IFTTT website. But there is a huge, untapped area there, those things that are unique to you and your family.

What if you could leverage the Echo to do… anything!?!?
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A Theory of Mind

Consciousness in specific, and the mechanism of thinking in general, have remained an opaque block to science in general and researchers in the area in specific. Here I attempt to lay out the fundamental underpinnings that support consciousness, as well as other related mental activity, and then place consciousness and related function into the context so established. I make a concerted effort not to lapse into jargon.

About the Title

As it turns out, “Theory of Mind” has some previous associations, so please note it was only intended as a description of the content here, not a declaration of association with these ideas.

I will present a description of how the brain operates. Not a metaphor — metaphors tell you what things are like, not what they are — but my conclusion as to how the brain, and therefore the mind, actually works.

I’m working backwards on this, as are we all — but after almost forty years of examining the problem I have come up with a model that has turned out to satisfy every question that I have about thought and consciousness in what I can only describe as a manner satisfactory to myself. Which is, I think, in itself notable. If for no other reason than everything I have ever come up with previously, or read about, has utterly failed to do so. So, dear reader, please come along as I try to explain myself. Literally.
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SdrDx breaks 10,000 users

I’m happy — kind of delirious, actually — to announce that the number of SdrDx installations has broken ten thousand as of Friday, June 6th, 2014. This number comes from counting the number of different IP’s of actually running SdrDx instances. The break down as of this evening is 6186 OSX installations, and 3865 Windows installations.

Now, this is not the same as a count of active SdrDx users, but it is a vey good estimate of the number who have actually tried out the program.

Thanks to everyone for surprising me with an unprecedented level of interest in this project. I appreciate it a great deal!

Ben
AA7AS

New OSX and Windows version of SdrDx: 2.12q

SdrDx 2.12q adds full gain support for the AFEDRI SDR, Two additional features, control volume with SHIFT page up and SHIFT page down, and s-meter can readout pre- or post-attenuator. See the link to the changes document, below.


  Screen shot: http://www.flickr.com/photos/fyngyrz/8675326983/in/photostream/lightbox/
    Downloads: http://fyngyrz.com/?p=915
Documentation: http://fyngyrz.com/sdrdxdoc/sitemap.html
      Changes: http://fyngyrz.com/sdrdxdoc/changes212.html

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