Archive for category Music

So… why “fyngyrz”? Pick, planchette, pluck.

The answer to that is pretty simple, really. Back in the day, I was all about guitar. I worked, dreamed, and struggled with guitar, and like many young men of my generation, I had some pretty high hopes. Alas, that career came to a screeching halt when I was offered payment in cocaine instead of money by an (otherwise) reputable studio you might very well recognize. studio-mg74 Both insulted and somewhat paranoid, I no longer made myself available to them as a studio musician, and that was the beginning of the end. It all worked out for the best, I think; turned out I was a pretty successful engineer, and on top of that, I actually enjoyed the work. From there, I began to focus on programming, and here we are today.

So anyway, here’s something from back in the day. It was recovered from 2nd-generation tape masters and consequently suffers from some sonic crud (not to mention the damage done by the mp3 encoding) but you’ll get the idea. It’s structured as a jam rather than a straight cover; a vague, building meditation upon a theme. Here you go:


Instrumental, Washburn MG-74 guitar, Gibson Les Paul studio bass.

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Publishers and the E-book Ecosphere

leap-pubIn e-tech, publishers look to be an obsolescent cog. They exist(ed?) with books in a legitimate role because someone needs to take on the cost of printing a physical book, shipping it to a store, etc., and your typical author can’t afford to do that. With an e-book, the costs – such as they are – are handled by the retailer (Apple, Amazon, smaller sellers – even the author.)

Speaking as someone somewhat familiar with the industry, publishers, long known for providing only minimal advances and the smallest possible royalty to the actual artist (the author(s) and illustrator(s)), appear to have no role in the e-book ecosphere.
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Using the Mac as a Guitar Workstation

I will start with a disclaimer: I am not in any way associated with the companies I’m going to mention here, other than being a paying customer for them.

Over my years as a professional musician, I’ve invested a phenomenal amount of money in musical gear. Amps, pedals, guitars, effects systems, you name it, I’ve probably bought it, beat it up, and traded it off in my search for “that sound.”

After about 40 years of playing, I’ve arrived at the combination of analog and digital gear that presently outfits my studio, and a few choice instruments. I was pretty happy with this too, except it isn’t very portable, and the setup is complex enough that there are times when I spend more time twiddling knobs than I do actually playing or recording.

Well, I’ve found something rather extraordinary. So much so I thought it was worth telling the world. As it turns out, there’s an easy, sensible, cool way to go that costs very little and gives you the world. Here’s the scoop.

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Back to my Music

My audio recording / performance gear

These images show some views of my music studio, which is set up in an 11′x19′ open loft above our main living space. You get to it via a bridge from the master bedroom loft on the other side of the building. I’m into rock, blues, metal, and I dip a bit into almost everything else. I just like to play, frankly. Even music I don’t like to listen to is fun to play.

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