Posts Tagged easy

aa_webpage.py — awesome and easy web pages with Python

I do a lot of generating web pages using Python. Python because I think Python 2.7 is awesome, and web pages because I do lots of work with various web sites that require dynamic results. Python is a very useful tool for me to get those dynamic results. It’s server-side (at least, the way I use it, it is, because I really try not to embed client-side resource usurping things), it is fast and efficient, and it is what I am comfortable with.

The thing is, web pages — generally speaking — aren’t all that simple if you really do them right. You can’t just throw a few tags together, test them on one browser, and hope you’re golden. Because you won’t be, I can pretty much promise you.
Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

aa_dbo.py — Simplified PostGreSQL use from Python

Screen shot 2015-05-04 at 3.00.37 PMHere’s a Python import library that, working in conjunction with the PyGreSql project, makes using PostGreSQL from within Python super, super easy. Complete with examples. You need PostGreSQL installed and running (obviously, I hope), and you’ll need to install the PyGreSQL Python module as well.

Click here to download the import library.

Revision Changes
1.0.1 Initial Release
1.0.0 Internal Version

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Making Python’s sqlite3 import easy as 1 2 3

Lurking within the normal Python 2.x distribution is the sqlite3 import, which is an amazingly powerful, no-server-required, mostly SQL compatible database engine that can be used in any project without restriction.

That’s the up side. The down side is, as a fairly complete database, there are many options and varied ways it can be used, and managing actual database transactions isn’t all that simple — to do it right, even a single query takes about sixteen lines of code. And yes, if you want maximum flexibility and the ability to use every feature in sqlite3, that’s how you should do it.

But. Most database operations are very straightforward. You want to issue a single command to the database, or a query. Perhaps you want to write a bunch of data and then commit it all at once so that the database doesn’t contain part of the data from a more complex transaction. You need to know if something went wrong, and if it did, what it was. Those are by far the most common use cases for me, and I suspect that’s true for others as well.

Frankly, it’s difficult enough dealing with the SQL query language itself. Why make actually using it harder than it has to be?
Read the rest of this entry »

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,